hp[in]hb: ott heller

ott h 1 1On a Tuesday in January of 1942, the New York Rangers were planning to make their game against the visiting Detroit Red Wings a benefit to celebrate the career and contribution of one of their senior defencemen. Born in Berlin, Ontario, when there still was such a place, Ott Heller was 31 that year, and in his 11th year working the Ranger blueline. But then someone said no, forget it — coach Frank Boucher, maybe? As Toronto’s Daily Star reported:

The idea was called off at the last minute, fearing it might hex the team or perhaps Ott himself.

The team did fine: in front of 11,000 fans, they beat Detroit, 3-2, which put them in second place in the standings, tied with the eventual Stanley Cup champions from Toronto. (Boston was in first.) The Rangers also tied a club record that night, having scored a goal in 77 consecutive NHL games.

Heller, for his part, fell into the boards. At New York’s Polyclinic Hospital, they gave him the bad news: his left shoulder was broken, and he’d be off the ice for a month. That’s what he was telling his goaltender, I’m guessing, when Sugar Jim Henry came to visit him a couple of days later (above).

Also of note, same game, Red Wings’ coach Jack Adams went chasing after referee Norm Lamport in the second period when the latter called a penalty on Detroit Eddie Wares. Adams didn’t dispute the call, he just thought that New York’s Lynn Patrick should have been banished, too, for a high stick that cut Wares’ mouth. The Globe and Mail:

… Jack Adams walked out on the ice a few steps before he remembered the financial consequences and scrambled back on the bench. Even so, it was understood his sally was sufficient to cost him the automatic fine of $100 imposed in such cases.