detroit cup city, 1936

Wings Won: April 11 was a Saturday in 1936, including at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto, where the Detroit Red Wings contrived to win their first Stanley Cup, ousting the hometown Maple Leafs by a score of 3-2 and thereby wrapping up the best-of-five championship series by three games to one. The photo here dates to a few weeks earlier, when the Red Wings dispatched the Montreal Maroons to reach the final. Celebrating that are (from left) winger Johnny Sorrell, coach and manager Jack Adams, and defenceman Scotty Bowman. No, not that Scotty Bowman; this one was Winnipeg-born and christened Ralph. With Sorrell and Adams, he was aboard when the Wings won a second straight cup in 1937.

books that hockey players read: goosefellas

Ebbie Goodfellow, who was born in Fallowfield, Ontario, on Ottawa’s edge, on a Monday of this very date in 1906, was a Detroit Olympic and a Falcon and a Cougar early in his career, but he built his Hall-of-Fame name as a Red Wing. He played at both centre and on defence during his 13 NHL seasons, wearing the number 5 on his sweater as he captained the Red Wings in 1934-35 and again from 1938 through 1941. Winner of the Hart Trophy as the NHL’s most valuable player in 1939-40, Goodfellow was (as The Ottawa Journal testified) “possessed of one of the hardest and truest shots in hockey.” His Red Wings were Stanley Cup champions in 1936 and again in ’37. When a leg injury curtailed his playing career in 1941, he carried on as a coach assisting head Detroit honcho Jack Adams, and it was in that capacity that Goodfellow got his name on another Stanley Cup, in 1943. He gave Old Mother Goose a read-through at least once in his time, as is documented here, in the company of his loyal son, Ebbie, Jr., in February of 1939.

 

net worth

Nels Stewart shoots, Normie Smith stymies; that’s Wings’ centreman Gord Pettinger arriving late to the action. Stewart’s New York Americans did end up prevailing on this night at Madison Square Garden in early February of 1937, with the lowly Amerks  outlasting the defending Stanley Cup champions from Detroit by a score of 3-2.

Smith, who died on a Tuesday of this date in 1988, got his NHL start with Montreal’s Maroons before going on to play seven further seasons — winning two Cups — with Detroit. Though the NHL’s official recordkeeping doesn’t extend back far enough to recognize it, Smith holds the record for most saves in a game. On March 24, 1936, in the NHL’s longest-ever game, the Wings beat the Maroons 3-2 in the sixth overtime when Mud Bruneteau beat Montreal’s Lorne Chabot. Chabot had rerouted 67 shots before that, while Smith barred 90.

west winger

Wartime Wing: Ken Kilrea was born in Ottawa on a Thursday of this date in 1919. He followed his older brothers Hec and Wally to the NHL, making his debut as a 20-year-old with the 1938-39 Detroit Red Wings. Hec, 31, was in the Motor City line-up that year, too, though Wally, who was 29, had departed the team at the end of the previous season. (Legendary junior coach Brian Kilrea was a nephew, son of the eldest Kilrea brother, Jack.) Young Ken, a left winger, played parts of five seasons with the Red Wings; he’s pictured here in his last campaign, 1943-44, when NHLers doubled as billboards for U.S. war bonds. Kilrea’s other war service included a stint with the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps that saw him skate (and win a 1943 Allan Cup) with the Ottawa Commandos on a team that also featured the talents of Sugar Jim Henry, Ken Reardon, Mac and Neil Colville, and Bingo Kampman. Ken Kilrea died at the age of 70 in 1990.

hockeytownbound

Y Not: Steve Yzerman played 22 seasons for the Detroit Red Wings, and he served 19 of those as team captain before his retirement in 2006. After nine seasons with the Tampa Bay Lightning, Yzerman makes his return to the Detroit fold this afternoon as the team announces his appointment as GM. He’ll succeed Ken Holland who, it’s reported, will take on an advisory role with the team.

 

all due respect: detroit honours ted lindsay at centre ice

Members of Ted Lindsay’s extended family were on hand today to meet members of the public who came to pay their respects to the memory of the late Detroit Red Wings’ left winger who died on Monday at the age of 93. A private family funeral will be held tomorrow at St. Andrew’s Church in Rochester, Michigan. Today, the ice was covered at Little Caesars Arena, and the lights were dimmed. From 9:07 this morning through to 7:07 tonight, a steady file of fans and well-wishers greeted the family at centre-ice, where Lindsay’s closed casket lay in state under banners honouring his number 7 (retired by the Red Wings in 1998) and the four Detroit teams with which Lindsay won Stanley Cups. Flanking this tableau were artifacts from Lindsay’s distinguished career. Alongside the Art Ross Trophy (he won it as the NHL’s leading scorer in 1949-50) and the Ted Lindsay Award (rewarding, since 2010, the NHL MVP as voted by players) was the fabled Doniker Trophy — a latrine bucket seconded to service as a memento of a 1954 outdoor game that Lindsay’s Red Wings played an exhibition game against inmates at Marquette State Prison on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

(Images: Stephen Smith)