wings nuts

Go Wings Go: Toronto’s 2017 Leafs skate in Detroit tonight to renew an old rivalry. In February of 1961, when the Red Wings paid a visit to Maple Leaf Gardens, the crew of winged-wheel fans who made the trip from Michigan included, from left, Rose Marie Galitz, Andrew Sorovetz, and Jack Walker. The game they witnessed would have been a disappointment, with the home team skating to a 4-2 victory. Detroit’s defence was “slipshod,” by one report, leaving goaltender Terry Sawchuk to fend for himself. The Leafs got goals from Bon Nevin, George Armstrong, Ron Stewart, and —“untouched and skating like a gale” down the length of the rink — Eddie Shack. Detroit’s goals came from Vic Stasiuk and Marcel Pronovost. (Photo: Michael Burns)

held ’em, hall

Marilyn Kluk and Fred Stoneberg Feb 16 1959 Standby Club Stadium

Montreal was sitting high atop the NHL standings in February of 1959, looking back down at Chicago in second. The Bruins were a point behind the Black Hawks the night Boston stopped in at the Stadium for a visit mid-month — a win would vault them ahead of Chicago.

That’s the background here. Many of the 15,046 fans who showed up to watch the game were in favour of the Bruins not achieving this — most, even. Included in that number were members of the Black Hawks’ loyal upperdeck association of fans known as the Standby Club. Whatever they could do to help in the effort to turn back the Bruins, well, they were willing to do that thing. For instance: rigging up a big bedsheet message to exhort Chicago goaltender Glenn Hall not to let in more goals than his teammates could score down at the other end. Marilyn Kluk and Fred Stoneberg were in charge of the operation: that’s them on either end of the banner.

And the game? Chicago started off fine, building a 3-0 first-period lead on goals that Ted Lindsay, Bobby Hull, and Dollard St. Laurent put past Boston’s Don Simmons.

But. Then. Chicago had been giving up leads that winter and here again (as the Chicago Tribune’s Charles Bartlett put it) they “went wastrel.” They kept the Bruins at bay for most of the second period. Until they didn’t. Bartlett:

The Hawk defense was its obstinate best in protecting Hall thru every minute of the second period except the 20th. Guy Gendron lofted the puck toward the Chicago net, and Hall raised his club for the save. The puck barely skinned over the goalie’s blade after running up his arm, then dribbled down his back and into the cage.

The Bruins needed just 17 seconds of the 20 minutes allotted for the third period to tie it up. Bronco Horvath scored first at 8:53 followed rapidly by Johnny Bucyk.

Bartlett called the Black Hawks “smug” and “profligate” in his write-up, but when the game ended in a 3-3 tie, they were still in second place. Hall held on.

 

boston thronged

Iceward: Boston’s Bruins make their way to the ice at the Garden, circa 1939. Leading the way is Frank Brimsek, followed by Eddie Shore, Charlie Sands, Dir Clapper, Cooney Weiland, Jack Portland, and Roy Conacher.

 

(© Arthur Griffin. Courtesy of the Griffin Museum of Photography. Photograph may not be reproduced in any form per the copyright holder. All rights reserved.)

boston throng

Wayfinder: Policemen clear the way as the New York Rangers — they’re somewhere, back there — head for the ice at the Boston Garden, circa 1939.

 

(© Arthur Griffin Courtesy of the Griffin Museum of Photography. Photograph may not be reproduced in any form per the copyright holder. All rights reserved.)

that perfectly nice blue sweater

moosa

Photojournalist Rosemary Gilliat Eaton travelled to Canada’s eastern Arctic in 1960, stopping that August in what was then Frobisher Bay, N.W.T. — today’s Iqaluit, Nunavut. Someone she met there was a boy named Moosa (her notes also refer to him as Mosha, Moshah, and Mosher), seen here in his Leaf warms, preparing polar bear meat for a stew.

British-born in 1919, Eaton settled in Canada, in Ottawa; later she went to Nova Scotia, making her home in a community that may not then have been much on the national hockey map but is now: Cole Harbour. She died in 2004. The archive of her life’s work runs to 100,000 images, most of which are divided between Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa and the Cole Harbour Heritage Farm Museum.

(Photo: Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada / e010799968)