this week: till famine and the ague eat them up

Swiss Misses: A U.S. foray at Switzerland's goal ends with a save at the Winter Olympics in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany in February of 1936. The Americans won 3-0.

Swiss Misses: A U.S. foray at Switzerland’s goal ends with a save at the Winter Olympics in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany in February of 1936. The Americans won this early-round game, 3-0, and when it was all over their medals were bronze.

One of the hockey players whose name each of Russia’s 143 million people know is Alex Ovechkin, according to Slava Malamud, a writer for Sport Express. There are one or two others, he said, naming no names.

No-one needs a gold medal more than Ovechkin, suggested Lucas Aykroyd, at IIHF.com.

Former Flame and Leaf left winger/present fitness maharishi Gary Roberts was tweeting this week: “Eliminate refined sugars and artificial sweeteners,” he advised, “— use natural options like raw honey, pure maple syrup & coconut sugar.”

There were questions this week about whether the leg Steven Stamkos broke in November is going to keep him from Canada’s team at the Olympics. He’s healed up enough to be practicing with Tampa Bay, and staying positive, but as TSN.ca reported, he hasn’t got the go-ahead quite yet:

“You just have to listen to your body,” Stamkos said. “We’re talking a lot about the Olympics and my goal is to try to be ready for those Games, but your body doesn’t lie. If you’re doing certain movements and you feel pain then that’s an indicator that maybe it’s not quite ready.”

Meanwhile, Dmitry Chesnokov from Puck Daddy at Yahoo! Sports talked to Detroit coach Mike Babcock about Pavel Datsyuk, whose body injury has been described in recent days as both “lower” and “undisclosed.” Will Datsyuk play this week?

“I got no idea,” Babcock said. “I just watched him in practice, his one leg isn’t holding up. Obviously, Pavel wants to play for his country, and he wants to be a part of things, but you got to be healthy.”

Is he going to be okay for Sochi, where he’s supposed to be captaining the Russians?

Babcock paused. “I am not the doctor,” he said. “I don’t have a clue.” Continue reading

this week: why you think I’m not happy?

bobby oOn his 65th birthday, Bobby Orr said he didn’t feel sick. Probably, he said, he should exercise more. But: “Overall, I’m thrilled.”

Janet Dziurzynski was sitting at home in Lloydminster, Alberta, watching on TV on March 6 as Toronto’s Frazer McLaren punched her son Dave in the head and he fell, smack, to the ice. “Of course, I was crying,” she said this week.

A defenceman, Cody Franson, spoke to TSN.ca of that point in a game the Leafs play where it all falls apart. “You can almost feel it coming sometimes. We get sloppy for a shift. It’s like it’s just kind of contagious. The bench can feel it.”

Jordin Tootoo’s teeth fell out and broke or were swept away in a raging river or … thieves made off with them? We don’t know the whole story, just what Tootoo tweeted: “The joys of having fake teeth……. They eventually fall out. Toothless for a while I’m guessing. First day of our week long roadie. UNCLE.”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper liked the old-fashioned maroon-and-white uniforms the Vancouver Canucks wore this week in their game against Detroit.  “The Millionaires sweaters are a nice tip of the cap to the 1915 Cup champions and to hockey history,” he twittered. “Well done.”

A former teammate, the Kings’ Mike Richards, said, “Kimmo Timonen is classiest guy in the league.” Which was nice. The Philadelphia defenceman was playing his 1,000th NHL game on his 38th birthday, so there was more, too. Teammate Braydon Coburn said, “He’s not the fastest guy. He’s not the biggest guy. He’s a tough little Finn. He’s been a smart player to be in the league that long.”

That was before the game, which the Flyers lost 4-2 to Tampa Bay. A few hours later, CSNPhilly.com reported, “Players appeared both dazed and disillusioned after the game.”

Said goalie Ilya Bryzgalov, “It’s sad. What else can you say? Nothing else you can do.” Continue reading

this week: none of your business

skaters

“I can hide on the ice,” said a winger for the New York Rangers, Carl Hagelin. “I can disappear.”

In The Hockey News, Ken Campbell asked the question: does the ill-advised, impetuous, and/or alcohol-fuelled behaviour of unrelated players with the last name Kane make them bad people?

“Oh, my God,” Bobby Orr said the first time he saw Connor McDavid when the boy was 13.

Toronto coach Randy Carlyle described James van Riemsdyk’s success as a Maple Leaf as a marriage that’s working, for now.

“I think I’ll keep the puck,” said Toronto’s Ben Scrivens after he’d wrapped up his first NHL shutout, “maybe give it to my parents.”

A couple of days later Scrivens stoppered the Leafs to a second straight shutout: “I think I can stop the puck if I can see it,” he said. “Sometimes you get shutouts. Sometimes pucks go off shinpads and you get pulled.” And so it was: next game, Tampa Bay, he was extracted from a losing effort in the third period.

In New York, winger Rick Nash injured his undisclosed, which is to say he didn’t disclose his injury.

Asked by a reporter for clarification, Nash’s coach, John Tortorella, said, “None of your business.”

“It bothers me,” Nazem Kadri said after the rink announcer in Florida mispronounced his name.

The reporters kept asking about Rick Nash. “He’s out,” Tortorella said. Continue reading