sold

That’s it, you can just glimpse it, right there, by Clarence Campbell’s knee: the red 1955 riot-seat that sold last night as the big Classic Auctions fall blow-out came to an end. Or — can you? Maybe not. It’s there, though, if you can picture it underneath the NHL president in his moment of crisis. Nineteen bidders battled for that seat last night, with the winner prevailing at a price of $3,676 — a true bargain, I’d say, considering that it went for $12,000 in 1996. That’s Miss King, by the way, in the photo, next to her boss and future husband. I’m supposing that this is after the smoke-bomb was tossed but before the tomato — hey, is that a BlackBerry Campbell has in his hand? Now that would be worth something.

Classic Auctions reports that it “realized” more than $1.1-million last night. Other notable prices paid:

• Bobby Orr’s sweater number 4 from the 1976 Canada Cup went for $88,456 after 23 bids.

• Wayne Gretzky’s big old ugly cardigan sold for $517 (9 bids).

• Valeri Kharlamov’s car-accident vinyl-looking wallety thingum went for $2,248 (22 bids).

• those old Chicago Stadium brass gauges I should have gone after: $691 (10 bids).

Howie Morenz’s death-skates commanded a price of $7,756 this time, with 13 bids. Very reasonable indeed, considering they previously sold for $25,000. Any bets on how long before they show up on the market again?

the crying of lot 25

Classic AuctionsThe last time they sold these skates the price was $15,000, which would be extravagant if they were just any skates, which they’re not, obviously, because who would pay so much for skates? It’s not as though it’s even the full skate package we’re talking about here, either, these are just the blades for sale, detached blades, no boots, bootless, so if you were going to be buying them for the backyard rink this winter, you’d have to be buying boots separately, at further cost, and also paying somebody to bolt them together. Not that you’d do that. Why would you? These are blades that belonged to Howie Morenz, which means they’re not for skating so much as for — that’s the big question. What would you do with these famous blades of skates that you bought?

I guess you could display them on your dining-room sideboard. You could carry them with you in your briefcase to show clients. Christmas presents for the children? Continue reading