this week: none of your business

skaters

“I can hide on the ice,” said a winger for the New York Rangers, Carl Hagelin. “I can disappear.”

In The Hockey News, Ken Campbell asked the question: does the ill-advised, impetuous, and/or alcohol-fuelled behaviour of unrelated players with the last name Kane make them bad people?

“Oh, my God,” Bobby Orr said the first time he saw Connor McDavid when the boy was 13.

Toronto coach Randy Carlyle described James van Riemsdyk’s success as a Maple Leaf as a marriage that’s working, for now.

“I think I’ll keep the puck,” said Toronto’s Ben Scrivens after he’d wrapped up his first NHL shutout, “maybe give it to my parents.”

A couple of days later Scrivens stoppered the Leafs to a second straight shutout: “I think I can stop the puck if I can see it,” he said. “Sometimes you get shutouts. Sometimes pucks go off shinpads and you get pulled.” And so it was: next game, Tampa Bay, he was extracted from a losing effort in the third period.

In New York, winger Rick Nash injured his undisclosed, which is to say he didn’t disclose his injury.

Asked by a reporter for clarification, Nash’s coach, John Tortorella, said, “None of your business.”

“It bothers me,” Nazem Kadri said after the rink announcer in Florida mispronounced his name.

The reporters kept asking about Rick Nash. “He’s out,” Tortorella said. Continue reading

this week: I’ve never been a goalie

abel's in“I don’t know why something happened,” Edmonton rookie Nail Yakupov said this week.

Asked a question, Toronto captain Dion Phaneuf said, “You don’t ask questions.” He’d played a lot of minutes in a loss to the New York Rangers, more than 30, and people were wondering: too much? “As a player, you go out when you’re told to go out,” said Phaneuf.

His teammate, Mike Komisarek, talked to TSN about what happened in practice when he got frustrated by missing the net with slapshots, which is when he swung his stick, from which bits of graphite flew into his face, which is why the doctor had to stitch his eyeball. “It’s not the stick’s fault,” he allowed.

Why so much punching in the NHL since the start of the season? Calgary’s Tim Jackman was asked that and here’s what he thought: “I guess you could say a lot of the fights are from pent-up energy that guys have been holding onto longer than they’re used to.”  Continue reading