smith’ll sit

Mythical Mario: The colourful 30-page graphic biography that Revolutionary Comics published in 1993 to tell Mario Lemieux’s story takes a meandering (and occasionally fanciful) tour of 66’s hockey exploits. Here, right at the end, it’s all the excitement of the 1992 playoffs packed into one page. The bottom panels depict a notorious scene from the opening game of the Stanley Cup finals, Chicago at Pittsburgh. “I can’t respect Mario for diving,” Blackhawks’ coach Mike Keenan did rail after the game, which (spoiler alert) ended with Lemieux scoring an overtime powerplay winner after Steve Smith went to the penalty box. “It’s an embarrassment, an embarrassment to the game, an embarrassment to the players he plays with. Mario has got the Mario Rule. He’s a protected player and therefore they don’t call the dives on him.” The Associated Press, meanwhile, reported that TV replays showed that Lemieux was truly tripped and “didn’t try to draw the penalty.” Also, Lemieux’s response: “I actually didn’t dive that time.”

lift-off

Flyboy: Like Frank Brimsek and Mike Karakas (and … well, Bob Dylan, too), Sam LoPresti hailed from Minnesota’s Iron Range. He guarded Chicago’s goal for two seasons in the early 1940s before volunteering himself out of hockey and into the U.S. Navy. Posing here in 1940-41, he puts Emile Francis to shame, I’d say, sailing across his net in search of a puck that may or not ever show up.

 

far flung

It’s said that Frank Brimsek hated having his photograph taken for fear that the flash would harm his eyes and thereby his puckstopping prowess. I don’t know how true that is — he does seem to have posed unblinkingly for a whole lot of (very handsome) portraits during his NHL career, in several classic poses, including the Standing Tall and the Pucks Have Been Known To Feint Dead Away, Facing My Icy Glare. Those aren’t the only ones available to the goaltender facing a photographer, of course. Roy Worters perfected the Ennui I’m Projecting Oughta Stop At Least A Few. And as Emile Francis demonstrates here, in 1947, there’s also the No Way That Puck Is Going To Dip Down Under The Crossbar, But Oh Well, Best Maybe To Fling Myself Across The Net Just In Case. Now 91, Francis is maybe best remembered now as a long-time and even legendary coach and general manger of the New York Rangers, but his career as a guardian of NHL nets lasted six years before that. Brimsek and Chicago’s Mike Karakas are generally credited with introducing a pocketed catching-glove to the goaltender’s armour in the late 1930s, but it was Francis who adapted a first-baseman’s mitt into what we recognize today as the goaltender’s trapper. In Francis’ first season as a Black Hawk, Detroit coach Jack Adams tried to have the glove banned as oversized and therefore illegal. He wasn’t successful, and after NHL president Clarence Campbell took a look and deemed it permissible, the Francis trapper became standard gear in NHL creases. The man they called the Cat would play two seasons in Chicago Black Hawks before a trade took him to the Rangers, where he served mostly as a back-up to Chuck Rayner.

 

a.k.a. zilch

Stopper: Born this day in 1915 in Eveleth, Minnesota, Frank Brimsek earned the nickname Mr. Zero in his rookie year, 1938-39, when he replaced an injured Tiny Thompson in the Boston Bruins’ net and recorded shutouts in six of the first eight games he played. His nine seasons with the Bruins bracketed a two-year stint during World War II with the U.S. Coast Guard. Working the Boston nets, he won Calder and Vézina and Stanley cups, before finishing his NHL career with a single season, ’49-’50, as a Chicago Black Hawk.

 

chuck talk

Listen Up: Members of the 1947-48 Chicago Black Hawks lend a post-practice ear to coach Charlie Conacher. They are, top, in back, from left to right: Bill Gadsby, Gus Bodnar, Ernie Dickens Middle: Conacher, Red Hamill, Metro Prystai, Doug Jackson, Emile Francis, Alex Kaleta, Doug Bentley, Bob Goldham Front: John Mariucci, Bud Poile, Adam Brown, Bill Mosienko, Roy Conacher, Gaye Stewart.