one moore time

Shop Talk: Born in Montreal on a Tuesday of this same date in 1931, legendary Canadiens left wing Dickie Moore was part of six Stanley-Cup winning teams in the 1950s and ’60s. He twice led the NHL in scoring, winning the Art Ross Trophy in 1958 and ’59. Pictured here with his wife, Joan, on a shopping spree at some point during the ’50s, Moore was inducted into hockey’s Hall of Fame in 1974. He died at the age of 84 in 2015.

all due respect: detroit honours ted lindsay at centre ice

Members of Ted Lindsay’s extended family were on hand today to meet members of the public who came to pay their respects to the memory of the late Detroit Red Wings’ left winger who died on Monday at the age of 93. A private family funeral will be held tomorrow at St. Andrew’s Church in Rochester, Michigan. Today, the ice was covered at Little Caesars Arena, and the lights were dimmed. From 9:07 this morning through to 7:07 tonight, a steady file of fans and well-wishers greeted the family at centre-ice, where Lindsay’s closed casket lay in state under banners honouring his number 7 (retired by the Red Wings in 1998) and the four Detroit teams with which Lindsay won Stanley Cups. Flanking this tableau were artifacts from Lindsay’s distinguished career. Alongside the Art Ross Trophy (he won it as the NHL’s leading scorer in 1949-50) and the Ted Lindsay Award (rewarding, since 2010, the NHL MVP as voted by players) was the fabled Doniker Trophy — a latrine bucket seconded to service as a memento of a 1954 outdoor game that Lindsay’s Red Wings played an exhibition game against inmates at Marquette State Prison on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

(Images: Stephen Smith)

johnny sorrell: a dead shot, if not the best conversationalist on the club

Born on this day in 1904 in Chesterville, Ontario, south of Ottawa, Johnny Sorrell launched his 11-year NHL career in 1930 when Detroit’s team was still the Falcons. He had his best years with the team once they when they’d transformed  into Red Wings, twice contributing 20-goal seasons,  twice helping Jack Adams’ team win the Stanley Cup, in 1936 and ’37. A trade later took him to New York, where he skated parts of four seasons for the Americans. “A dead shot equipped with a great burst of speed,” was how a Detroit writer described  Sorrell in 1933, declaring him as (perhaps) “the fastest left winger in hockey going into the goal from the blueline.” Also? “Not the best conversationalist on the club, but he is one of the wits of the dressing room when he is in the mood to get some timely repartee off his chest.”

song to woody

Nicht Ganz Ein Berliner: Woodrow Dumart was born on a Saturday of this date in 1916, the year that his southern Ontario hometown changed its name from Berlin to Kitchener. He went by Woody or Porky, of course, through the course of his NHL career, which spanned 16 seasons, all of them with the Boston Bruins. He was mainly a left winger in those years, skating alongside Milt Schmidt and Bobby Bauer as part of the legendary Kraut Line. Woody Dumart died in 2001, in Boston, at the age of 84. (Image © Arthur Griffin Courtesy of the Griffin Museum of Photography; photograph may not be reproduced in any form per the copyright holder. All rights reserved.)