flin flon’s flyer

Dressed For Success: Born on a Saturday of this date in 1949 in Flin Flon, Manitoba, Bobby Clarke is 70 today. The Philadelphia Flyers he captained in the early 1970s raised two Stanley Cups, of course, and he won a Masterton and a Selke Trophy for himself, along with (three times) the Hart Memorial Trophy he’s brandishing here in his best duds. He was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1987. Is this not the time or place to mention that he broke Valeri Kharlamov’s ankle with a craven slash in the sixth game of the 1972 Summit Series? Probably not.

a hockey babe ruth, they called him

There’s none of us now who was around to see Joe Simpson skate, so let’s listen to what his contemporaries had to say. Newsy Lalonde, circa 1923, called him the greatest hockey player alive. The great Duke Keats rated Simpson one of the best defencemen he ever saw, on a par with Eddie Shore and Sprague Cleghorn. “He made dazzling, dodging rushes,” Jim Coleman hymned in 1973, “a technique of puck-carrying that earned him [the] nickname ‘Corkscrew Joe.’”

There’s more on Simpson — including discussions of his many nicknames; just what the corkscrew might have looked like; reference to my grandfather; and Wally Stanowski turning pirouettes at Maple Leaf Gardens — over here. Here, for now, we’ll go on to recall that Harold Edward Simpson happens to have been born on an 1893 Sunday of this date in Selkirk, Manitoba, where he ended up skating with his hometown Fisherman before war broke in 1914.

There’s more to know about his military service — that’s still to come — but the short version with hockey at the forefront goes like this: having enlisted with Winnipeg’s 61st Battalion in the summer of 1915, Simpson led the battalion’s hockey team to an Allan Cup championship in 1916 before the soldiers stowed their hockey sticks and shipped out for France. Simpson was wounded on the Somme in ’16 and then again later in the war — but, again, we’ll come back to that another time. Returning from France in 1919, he rejoined the Selkirk Fishermen. The five subsequent seasons he played with the Edmonton Eskimos of the WCHL included a trip, in 1923, to the Stanley Cup finals (Edmonton lost to the Ottawa Senators). They called him Bullet Joe and the Babe Ruth of hockey when he arrived in the NHL in 1926, joining the newfound New York Americans at the age of 33. He played five seasons in New York and, later, served as coach for another three. Elevated to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1963, Joe Simpson died in 1973, at the age of 80.

fall fashion

Detroit Red Wings coach Jimmy Skinner (right) gears up in the fall of 1957 with his boss, manager Jack Adams. A son of Selkirk, Manitoba, Skinner succeeded Tommy Ivan on the Wings’ bench in 1954, guiding the team to a second consecutive Stanley Cup championship in the spring of ’55. The summer of 1957 was a tumultuous one in Detroit. In July, Ted Lindsay departed the team, traded to Chicago after 13 seasons and 700 points for the crime of heading up the NHL’s incipient player’s association. Lindsay had said he’d rather retire than leave Detroit, but he’d finally agreed to the trade. At a press conference, Lindsay described “the personal resentment of the Detroit general manager toward me.” Adams denied that there was any feud: he said that shipping out 31-year-old Lindsay, the fourth highest goalscorer in NHL history, and All-Star goaltender Glenn Hall, 25, for four players and cash was all about renewing the Red Wings. With Terry Sawchuk back in the net that year, Detroit did end up in third place in the final NHL standings, though they fell to the unstoppable Montreal Canadiens in the opening round of the playoffs. Skinner was gone by then, having resigned as coach in January on a doctor’s advice about the migraines he couldn’t quell. Sid Abel was the man who replaced him, and he kept the job for the next ten years. His old linemate Ted Lindsay would return to Detroit for a final season in 1964-65 during that time. As for Stanley Cups, Abel’s Wings came close, losing in the Finals four times during his tenure. The team would go without a championship until 1997, with Scotty Bowman in command.

hall-passed: reggie leach

With the Hockey Hall of Fame announcing its 2018 class this afternoon, Martin Brodeur is the name that fans and pundits alike seem to be settling on as a sure bet. Other candidates thought to be up at the front of the pack include Martin St. Louis and Daniel Alfredsson. There’s talk that hockey trailblazer Willie O’Ree, 82, might be in, too — maybe, the word was yesterday at NHL.com, he could be inducted as a builder for his quiet energy and devotion he’s put in as an ambassador for inclusion and diversity with the NHL’s Hockey is for Everyone initiative.

For a piece that went up yesterday at The New York Times, I’ve been talking to and writing about Indigenous hockey players recently.  Fred Sasakamoose was one of the first to play in the NHL, and I don’t know why he wouldn’t be in the conversation, too. I’m not sure whether Sasakamoose, who’s 84, has even been nominated, but I hope so: given his tireless work with and advocacy for Indigenous youth over the years, he’s as worthy a candidate as O’Ree.

Then there’s Reggie Leach. You’ll recall, maybe, the effort that the great John K. Samson organized to press the case for the Riverton Rifle to be welcomed into the Hall. In 2010, there was the song Samson recorded that doubled as a petition, both of which went by the name http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/rivertonrifle/.

In 2013, Samson put together a well-argued application supported by a very complete statistical package and accompanied by endorsements from, among others, novelist Joseph Boyden, Ian Campeau (a.k.a. DJ NDN) of A Tribe Called Red, writer Stephen Brunt, and Wab Kinew, who was then Director of Indigenous Inclusion at the University of Winnipeg. Samson and some of his friends would eventually go in person to deliver the whole bundle, song and stats and supplications, to the Hall’s very doors.

That’s worth watching, which you can do below, even if the whole enterprise was in vain: as of this hour, Reggie Leach still isn’t an Honoured Member of hockey’s Hall of Fame.

Talking to Leach, who’s 68 now, this past January, I asked him about that. He said that he was aware of continued efforts by friends and fans of his across the country who are still intent on convincing the Hall that the time is now, but that he doesn’t worry much about whether the call comes or not.

“I don’t get involved with it,” he told me from his home Aundeck Omni Kaning First Nation, near Little Current, Ontario, on Manitoulin Island. “I’m just happy that there are people who think that I should be in there. To me, that’s a great honour. They’re my Hall of Famers, those people. If I don’t get in, I really don’t care, because I think it’s mainly where you come from and who you played for that matters — stuff like that.”

(Top image: cover of John K. Samsons 2010 ANTI- EP “Provincial Road 222”)

 

 

washakada

Ice Time: Students rally around a puck at Washakada Industrial School in Elkhorn, Manitoba, northwest of Brandon, near the Saskatchewan border, circa 1911-15. Established by the Anglican Church in 1888, the Washakada Indian Home originally had room for 16 boarders. Fire destroyed most of the school’s buildings in 1895; the new, relocated Industrial School opened in 1899. At its peak, the school had an enrolment of 122. It closed in 1949. (Image: Glenbow Archives, NA-4101-40)

 

a man called mud

Born on this day in 1914 in St. Boniface, Manitoba, Modere Bruneteau played 11 seasons in the NHL, none of them for anybody other than the Detroit Red Wings. Mud is what they called him, everybody did, always, for all his right-winging years.

He made his mark early on. In the spring of 1936, when he was 21, Detroit called him up from the Olympics of the International League for the end of the regular season. In the opening game of the playoffs, the Red Wings battled Montreal’s Maroons through five overtimes and into a sixth at the Forum with neither goaltender, Detroit’s Normie Smith nor Montreal’s Lorne Chabot, conceding a goal. From (as the Detroit Free Press would report) “8.30 o’clock in the evening until 2.25 o’clock in the morning,” the two teams played on until, after 116 minutes and 30 seconds of extra time, Bruneteau took a pass from Hec Kilrea and fired the third goal of his young career past Chabot.

It’s still the longest game in the league’s history and lucrative, too, for the Wings. Doesn’t matter, I guess, whether they were Wings’ faithful or just happy to be going home: jubilant fans stuffed dollar bills into Bruneteau’s equipment as he left the ice in Montreal. He moved slowly enough that when the time came to divvy up the cash, he paid out $22 to each member of the Red Wings, including the trainer and the kid who lined up the sticks. A notoriously generous Red Wing fan stepped up, too, adding a further $50 to Bruneteau’s wallet.

That was early Wednesday morning. Later that afternoon, Lorne Chabot stopped in to the Windsor Hotel, where the Red Wings’ were encamped. In the Forum aftermath, fans had asked Chabot for the puck that had gone by him, and come morning he’d received a telegram from Winnipeg offering $50 for it. He’d turned them all down. Bruneteau wasn’t at the hotel, but Chabot found Detroit GM Jack Adams.

“Hell, Jack,” he’s supposed to have said. “Do you suppose that Mud would like the puck that beat me last night?”

Adams: “Gee, you’re grand, Lorne.”

Bruneteau’s on the record, too: when Adams handed him the puck, he’s said to have turned it over and over in his hands. “Gee whiz, gee whiz, that’s swell.”

The Red Wings played another six games that spring. The last one, a 3-2 win over the Toronto Maple Leafs, won them Stanley Cup. It was the first of two that Bruneteau would get his name on. He died in 1982 at the age of 67.

 

bower power

Goal Relationship: The inimitable Johnny Bower turns 93 today — as best we know, anyway. For years, the goaltender’s actual age was a national mystery if not a state secret. Bower himself was coy for much of his illustrious career, telling reporters at one point, “Just say I’m 35 going on 40.” He opened his 2006 autobiography with a definitive statement on the matter: “I was born November 8, 1924, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. No really, I was.” Here, he signs autographs on a Manitoba during the summer of 1965, when he was 40, probably. (Image: University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections, Winnipeg Tribune fonds, PC 18-2300-001)