vancouververgaert

VanCityStache: Born in Grimsby, Ontario, on a Monday of this date in 1953, Dennis Ververgaert turns 67 today. The Vancouver Canucks drafted him third overall in the NHL Amateur Draft, behind Denis Potvin (New York Islanders) and Tom Lysiak (Atlanta Flames), and ahead of Lanny McDonald (#4, Toronto Maple Leafs), Bob Gainey (#8, Montreal Canadiens), and Rick Middleton (#14, New York Rangers). As a 20-year-old rookie working the Canucks’ right wing, Ververgaert led the team in goals, with 26, in 1973-74, and ended up runner-up to Lysiak in Calder Trophy voting. He played six seasons with the Canucks and a further two with the Philadelphia Flyers before ending his career with the Washington Capitals in 1981.

 

 

cards catalogue

Full Deck: In his ongoing series “Peinture canadienne,” Quebec City artist Marc-Antoine K. Phaneuf has been arranging hockey cards to mirror the patterns and tendencies of Canadian abstract painting from the 1940s and ’50s. The installation pictured here was on show earlier this year at the Art Gallery of Windsor (Ontario) as part of the exhibition Power Play: Hockey in Canadian Contemporary Art. An assortment of some 3000 cards, it pays tribute to the scale and colour and verve of Jean-Paul Riopelle’s work, framing (as visitors to the Windsor show might have read at the show) “the faces of hockey’s past, moments of hyper-masculinity, elaborate styles of facial hair, stereotypical hockey helmet hairstyles, and action-filled facial expressions.” The work, curators proposed, “is both an homage to the history of hockey’s mass production in popular culture as well as a tribute to the speed of the game. Instead of overlapping thick impasto brushstrokes on a canvas, Phaneuf layers hockey cards onto a white wall to resemble the speed and ephemerality of gestural painting.”

 

(Images: Stephen Smith)   

razor’s edge: lost hockey moustaches of toronto, from jack adams to lou lamoriello

“It was my agent who brought it up to me,” said Martin. “I don’t know the exact rules, but (GM Lou Lamoriello) wants guys to be clean shaved and have relatively short hair. I’ve been playing in the league long enough to know that’s what he wants.”

Lamoriello’s teams have always been like that. Back when he was running the New Jersey Devils, his reputation of an old-school conservative who stressed conformity earned him the nickname “Tal-Lou-Ban.” Some even believe he influenced New York Yankees longtime owner George Steinbrenner into instituting a similar edict, resulting in star Don Mattingly being benched for growing his hair too long.

How long is too long in Toronto? Well, a safe bet is to keep it shorter than head coach Mike Babcock’s, who said, “I often have the longest hair.”

Matt Martin tells Michael Traikos of The National Post about cutting his long blond hair before joining the Toronto Maple Leafs, November 15, 2016

Toronto GM Lou Lamoriello doesn’t like to talk about the team’s grooming standards that keep his players so presentable. “I think everyone is overplaying it,” he told Traikos in 2015. “It’s not even a discussion process, as far as I’m concerned.” Which, of course, is the beauty of the thing: the best rules are the ones that enforce themselves. In February, when Toronto acquired centre Tomas Plekanec from Montreal, he got rid of his trademark goatee before joining the team. “I got messages from guys I played with that played under Lou,” Plekanec told reporters. “And they told me right away you got to shave that thing.”

For Lamoriello, a team that manscapes together … plays … better … together? I think that’s the rationale. All for one, none for mullets, mutton chops, Lannys, or Wendels. “We wanted to get a team,” he told Traikos, “everybody together, everybody doing similar things and thinking along the same way.”

Turns out there’s a whiskery history here, going all the way back to Toronto’s second NHL season. Jack Adams, we know, wore the league’s original moustache. Not so well known is that this year is the centenary of Adams having Lamoriello’d himself.

Jack Adams, later in his (clean-faced) Toronto career.

Start, though, with the first, 1917-18, a hundred years ago. While Toronto’s first NHL franchise lost its very first game, in December of 1917, the team didn’t let that stand in the way of a championship season. This month in 1918, the Torontos defeated the PCHA Vancouver Millionaires to win the first NHL-era Stanley Cup. They did it, almost certainly, with an entirely clean-shaven line-up.

So far as my researchers have been able to determine, 43 of the 44 players who skated in the NHL that first season did so free of any kind of facial hair. The question with Jack Adams, the 44th, remains: was he wearing a moustache when he debuted with Toronto that year or did he only grow it later, in time for his (and the NHL’s) second season?

Before he was a trophy (awarded to superlative NHL coaches) or a division (when the league still divided itself into divisions), prior to his decades-long reign over the Detroit Red Wings, coaching and managing and shaping the team’s personality through the force of his own, Adams was (of course) a very good centreman who began his NHL career playing for and, in the early 1920s, captaining Toronto.

Born in Fort William, Ontario, he made his hockey name there, too, winning an Allan Cup with his hometown (Thunder Bay Senior Hockey League) Maple Leafs in 1915. He subsequently served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force’s Railway Troops.

Adams was still in uniform in the winter of 1917-18 when he skated with the Sarnia Sailors in the OHA’s Senior loop and when, that January, he vociferously denied that he’d be turning professional and signing with Toronto — just a few weeks before he did exactly that. He played in eight games that year, though not in the Stanley Cup series, having been acquired too late in the campaign to qualify.

Corporal Adams was stationed in Hamilton, Ontario, come the fall, and there was talk that he’d coach the junior OHA team there, sitting out the NHL season. As it turned out, he was the first player to hand in his signed contract to Arenas manager Charlie Querrie, in October. His November was eventful: he started the month by marrying Helen Trimble and ended it demobilized from the Army. His discharge papers give his west-end Toronto address, 86 Close Avenue, and a grading on Character and Conduct: “very good.” His Trade or Calling was given as “elevator weighman.”

But while his Army paperwork logged his height (5’7”), complexion (fair), and eye-colour (grey), it bypassed his upper lip. For the news of what was going on there, we have to turn to the pages of The Toronto Telegram:

Toronto wouldn’t end up defending its championship that season. On the ice, they were altogether underwhelming, ending both halves of the season at the bottom of the (shallow) three-team NHL.

When play got underway in December, the team had difficulty winning a game, losing twice to the Montreal Canadiens and once to Ottawa.

By the time they lined up to meet the Senators again on New Year’s Eve, they were desperate. Corb Denneny scored a pair of goals to secure Toronto’s 4-2 that night, and Harry Cameron seems to have been a stand-out on defence.

But let’s not downplay the significance of the sacrifice that Jack Adams made that night, too, when he showed up at the rink having shaved off his trailblazing moustache. “His teammates had considered the hirsute adornment as their jinx,” The Ottawa Journal solemnly reported. “The Blues were therefore happy to see Adams with a clean face.”