high five

High Five: The Detroit Red Wings retire Nicklas Lidstrom's number 5 tonight, raising it to the rafters at the Joe Louis Arena before their game against the Colorado Avalanche. "It's pretty hard to be better in your position than Nick Lidstrom was," Detroit coach Mike Babcock was telling NHL.com this week.Lidstrom's name will be the seventh to hang in Detroit, joining Yzerman, Sawchuck, Lindsay, Howe, Delvecchio, and Abel on high. Above, a tribute to the fourfold Stanley-Cup-winning, seven-time Norris-Trophy-raising defenceman, in a high window of the abandoned Lafayette Building in downtown Detroit. Former building, that is: the Lafayette and its hockey art was demolished in 2010. (Photo: DetroitDerek Photography, www.flickr.com/detroitderek)

High Five: The Detroit Red Wings retire Nicklas Lidstrom’s number 5 tonight, raising it to the rafters at the Joe Louis Arena before their game against the Colorado Avalanche. “It’s pretty hard to be better in your position than Nick Lidstrom was,” Detroit coach Mike Babcock was telling NHL.com this week. Lidstrom’s name will be the seventh to hang in Detroit, joining Yzerman, Sawchuck, Lindsay, Howe, Delvecchio, and Abel on high. Above, a tribute to the fourfold Stanley-Cup-winning, seven-time Norris-Trophy-raising defenceman, in a high window of the abandoned Lafayette Building in downtown Detroit. Former building, that is: the Lafayette and its hockey-painted windows were demolished in 2010. (Photo: DetroitDerek Photography, http://www.flickr.com/detroitderek)

 

babes

One Babe And Another: Gordie Howe with a Ruth impersonator.

It wasn’t the hockey players they were trying to impress in 1925 when they called Bullet Joe Simpson the Babe Ruth of hockey. If they’d wanted to do that, they would have announced he was the Cyclone Taylor of hockey or maybe the Scotty Davidson. To some people who saw him play, Davidson was the best ever, barring none, which is intriguing to hear because, well — Scotty Davidson? But: Babe Ruth. 1925 was the year that bootlegger Big Bill Dwyer and his buddies bought the roster of the Hamilton Tigers and replanted it in Manhattan as the New York Americans. Tex Rickard needed a new attraction to fill his Madison Square Garden and hockey, he and Colonel John Hammond had decided, was it. To a New Yorker who’d never seen a game before, Cyclone Taylor wasn’t going to mean much. Everybody understood the dominance of Ruth, the swagger of the most famous Yankee of all — which still doesn’t explain how the team came to have two Babe Ruths playing for them that year. Continue reading