george hainsworth: surely a well-driven puck would bowl him over like a ten-pin

When the NHL was young, in a time of small goaltenders, George Hainsworth was … not so tiny as, say, Roy Worters, who measured in at 5’3’’ and a slight 135 pounds. Hainsworth, born in Gravenhurst, Ontario, on a Monday of this date in 1893, was a stout 5’6” with 150 pounds on him. His reputation for rebuffing pucks was already sizeable when he jumped from the WHL Saskatoon Sheiks to the NHL’s Montreal Canadiens in 1926. There, he not only succeeded the great Georges Vézina but won the first three editions of the trophy that was minted in Vézina’s name to honour the best goaltender in the league. In 1928-29 (incredibly), Hainsworth registered 22 shutouts in 44 regular-season games. He went on to help Montreal win two Stanley Cups, in 1930 and ’31. After seven seasons with the Canadiens, he was traded to Toronto in exchange for Lorne Chabot. Five seasons he spent with the Maple Leafs before returning for one more campaign with Montreal, 1936-37, before retiring at the age of 41. He was serving as an alderman in Kitchener, Ontario, when he was killed in a car accident near his hometown in the fall of 1950. He was 57.

“We suppose that one of the reasons hockey is such a great sport,” ran a memorial editorial in the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, “is that it demands the basic elements of man’s struggle for existence: courage, ability, and intelligence. These were the qualities which made George Hainsworth a star. So spare in stature that it seemed a well-driven puck must surely bowl him over like a ten-pin, he showed, in measure out of proportion to his tiny frame the mettle which every goalkeeper must have, plus the speed and deftness to turn aside flying rubber and the brains to outguess on-rushing forwards. The combination made him one of the greatest goalies in hockey history, and his net-minding feats … will be remembered long after his untimely death and its unfortunate cause have been forgotten.” Hainsworth was inducted in the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1961.

scrub on skates

worters

A birthday today for Roy Worters, born this day in 1900, in Toronto. Shrimp they called him, of course, because he was a tiny goaltender, smaller even than Darren Pang. The smallest man to have played in the NHL? Maybe so. Five-foot-three, 135 pounds are the dimensions generally given in the standard hockey references. He played nine seasons, most of those for the New York Americans, and won a Hart Trophy and Vézina for his miniature efforts, though never a Stanley Cup. He died in 1957; 12 years after that, in 1969, he was elevated to the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Harold Burr of The Brooklyn Daily Eagle wrote about a stop Worters made in January of 1933 against the Rangers:

Bill Cook took Frankie Boucher’s pass and beat Roy, refusing to go in and draw the Shrimp’s spread-eagle defense. The Rangers were riding rubber now and Bun Cook sent one swishing in on Worters, at the height of the little fellow’s jugular. It came with the velocity of a projectile, and from well beyond the blue line, lots of room to pick up speed.

“I swear I didn’t know how to play it,” confessed Worters, still rubbing a red spot on his neck and voice a little husky. “There wasn’t any time to jump and take it on my wishbone. So I got it in the Adam’s apple instead. It hurt, all right.”