mr. hockey & son

may rocket pkstrk

Hab Apparent: Tex Coulter painted Maurice Richard and his son Normand for a 1958 Hockey Blueline cover story. Inside, the Rocket told writer Dick Bacon about a recent injury to his Achilles tendon and what he might do after he retired. He wasn’t ruling out refereeing in the NHL, though he wasn’t sure they’d let him officiate Canadiens’ games for the first two or three years.

the gump’s tale

gump

In January of 1957, Boston goaltender Terry Sawchuk announced he was quitting the NHL, for a bit, or maybe for always. He ending up coming back, of course, but at the time that was very much in doubt. “My nerves are shot,” he said, “and I’m just edgy and nervous all the time.”

So that’s what Gump Worsley was talking about, in April, when the New York Rangers’ goaltender was coverboy (along with his eldest son, Lorne Jr.) for Hockey Blueline. Inside, as told to Dave Anderson, he got right down to business: people thought it was funny, now, to wonder about his nerves.

“When are you going to crack up?” they say. First of all, it’s not funny because Sawchuk is a sick guy. Second of all, I’ll never crack up.

I don’t believe all this talk about “nerves” because a goalkeeper is under fire all the time. If that’s the case, I should be the first one to crack. They shoot more at me than any goalkeeper in the National Hockey League.

If the number of shots at a goalkeeper is so important, then why hasn’t Al Rollins cracked up? Or Harry Lumley? They’ve been around longer than me and had a lot of shots taken at them. But they’re all right. Maybe they’re like me. They don’t worry about something they can’t do anything about … a goal.

Worsley, 29, had been in the NHL for three-and-a-half seasons at this point. That was the key to keeping cool as a netminder, he found — failing to worry. “My wife, Doreen,” he confided, “tells me nothing bothers me.” He made a study of this, and always had. Never looked up his goals-against average, paid no attention to rumours that he was destined for the minors.

Some goaltenders worked themselves into such a state that they couldn’t sleep, or eat. Not Gump:

My wife will tell you how I eat before a game. And how I sleep two-and-a-half, three hours. I usually eat a real big meal — two filet mignons, baked potato, green vegetable, salad, toast and tea. And then I take my nap. Sometimes she has trouble waking me.

After a game — win, lose or tie — I come home and eat another big meal. Not a sandwich, a meal.

That’s what worked for him. But while he may have maintained the same appetite at a steady level as his hockey career went on, his worrying evolved. Ten years later, playing for Montreal now, he may have had occasion to recall that old vow. As detailed in They Call Me Gump, his 1975 Tim Moriarty-assisted autobiography, things had changed. “I finally wound up with the goaltender’s occupational disease during the 1968-69 season with the Canadiens,” he’d write. “I suffered a nervous breakdown.”

At the age of 39, he was playing well in the Montreal net, but he was suffering emotionally. He didn’t like flying. That was a big part of it. Also, the Canadiens had changed coaches: Toe Blake was out, replaced by Claude Ruel. The new boss thought Worsley didn’t practice properly, just went through the motions. Blake had tolerated Worsley’s reluctance to extend himself on the understanding that he’d stay in shape and be ready when the games came around. Ruel was different: he liked to “blow his damn whistle and bark orders. … This got under my skin, and by the time the season was a month old we weren’t speaking.”

Fans, too, were taunting the Gump. That was something else. On November 26, 1968, the Canadiens were en route to Los Angeles by way of Chicago. The first leg of the flight was turbulent, and that was enough for Worsley, which is to say too much. At O’Hare Airport, he left the plane, telling Jean Béliveau that he was retiring. He took a train back to Montreal.

As Worsley recounts it, the breakdown wasn’t severe: “I got over it quickly.” Montreal GM Sam Pollock arranged for him to see a psychiatrist, and he did, and they talked about “everything.” Late in December he started skating on his own at the Forum. By January, he was back in the Canadiens goal.

The Globe and Mail reported that he’d conquered his fear of flying. The pudgy goalie, they called him. “There were a lot of things,” he said. “My nerves were gone. “I had a lot of problems, personal things.”

“I didn’t say anything to the guys. I kept it all inside. I guess you could say I was carrying a lot of worries on my shoulder. Perhaps unnecessarily, but that’s the way it was.”

floral glory

g howe pkstrk

Hockey’s Mister: Born on a March-ending Saturday in 1928, Gordie Howe turns 88 today. About his beginnings, Don O’Reilly wrote this in his 1975 biography, Mr. Hockey: The World of Gordie Howe: “Floral, Gordie’s birthplace, was once described by the New York Times, as a granary on the grim high plains of Saskatchewan, settled by homesteaders somewhere out between Saskatoon and futility.” In 1957, Tex Coulter’s handsome portrait of a happy Howe (above) adorned the cover of Hockey Blueline. The accompanying story was bylined (if not, maybe, entirely written by) Ted Lindsay. No buried leads here: “Gordie Howe — The Greatest!” Howe’s laid out his premise in the first two lines: “Gordie Howe is the greatest player in hockey! Gordie, in fact, may be the greatest hockey player ever.”

m major

mahovlich

Being Frank: The fans in Toronto cheered the man more than they heckled him, the night Frank Mahovlich took the Calder Trophy in hand, but let’s not forget: they did heckle. Born on this day in 1938, Mahovlich woke up this morning aged 78. He was just 20 by the end of the 1957-58 season when he edged out Chicago’s Bobby Hull and Phil Goyette of Montreal to win the NHL’s award for top rookie and the $1,000 cheque that went with it. It was October before NHL president Clarence Campbell handed him the actual trophy, in an on-ice ceremony before the Leafs’ third home game against Detroit. Toronto prevailed, once the puck dropped, by a score of 3-0, with Johnny Bower in the net and Mahovlich playing a key role that showed up on the scoresheet as assists on goals by Bob Pulford and Brian Cullen. The large lad from mining country, Globe and Mail sports editor Jim Vipond called him, telling the tale. He went on:

A somewhat controversial player on a team with a management record of submerging individualism in favor of collective effort. Mahovlich demonstrated that his speed and strength make him an excellent play-maker from the right wing position.

After a shaky first period in which he was jeered by some vociferous paying critics. Mahovlich later brought much more pleasant sounds from the lips of the majority of the 12,894 spectators as his exciting rink-length rushes set up two scoring plays. Only a combination of erratic shooting on the part of linemates, plus a weirdly bouncing puck, prevented at least four more goals.

glove, hand

goaler tex

Artistic Impression: When the artist (and former NFL lineman) Tex Coulter painted the cover for the 1963 Official National Hockey Annual, he chose the dramatic scene, above, in which a Leaf attacker is denied a goal by Montreal’s netminder. If we deduce that it’s a moment drawn from the previous season then it’s easy to zero in on the Stanley Cup semi-finals of 1962-63, when the eventual Stanley Cup winners from Toronto beat out the Canadiens. If that’s what we’re saying, then that would be Jacques Plante (1) in the mask, throwing everything he has into stopping the Leafs’ John MacMillan (8) while Bob Pulford (20) cruises in for clean-up. Questions remain: what happened to the Montreal defence? Also: assuming Plante dropped his stick and only threw his blocker, is that a penalty shot?

In fact, Coulter took his inspiration from the photo below, which dates back to the 1961-62 season. Detroit’s desperate goaltender is Hank Bassen, and it’s Boston right winger Wayne Connelly he’s denying. Trailing on the play is a (guilty? grateful?) Red Wings’ defenceman, Howie Young.

puck chasers 1