close your eyes and count to eight

Upshot: Montreal’s powerful Canadiens got the better of the cellar-dwelling Chicago Black Hawks one Saturday night in January of 1954, beating them 5-1 at the Forum on the strength of a Bernie Geoffrion hattrick. Sunday night, when the teams met again in Chicago, the ice tilted the other way: that one the Black Hawks won by a score of 8-3. Chicago had a pair of newcomers in the line-up, both of whom are shown here, above. Called up from the AHL’s Hershey Bears, left winger Jack McIntyre scored this goal and another on Montreal’s Gerry McNeil. Behind him is Ike Hildebrand, a right winger Chicago acquired from the Vancouver Canucks of the WHL. Arriving too late to aid his goaltender is Montreal defenceman Tom Johnson.

net presence

The first time Gerry McNeil defended the Montreal Canadiens’ net was in 1947, when he relieved an injured Bill Durnan at the Forum midway through a meeting with the New York Rangers. Montreal lost a 1-0 lead that night; the Rangers won 5-3. McNeil “wasn’t given the best of protection,” the Gazette’s Dink Carroll wrote, “but the fact remains that Durnan’s absence was felt.” McNeil started the next night, too, against Boston, holding the Bruins to a 2-2 tie. “Steady but unspectacular” was the verdict on that performance.

Born in Quebec City on a Saturday of this date in 1926, McNeil remains largely unsung in the annals of Montreal goaltending greatness. To demonstrate why that’s not fair you might cite the fact that in all four seasons in which he was Montreal’s first-choice puckstop, from 1950 through ’54, Canadiens made it to the Stanley Cup finals. “The plucky goaler,” Dink Carroll called him in 1953 when McNeil led his team to a championship with a fifth-game shutout of the Boston Bruins. Often remembered as the man Toronto’s Bill Barilko scored on to win the 1951 Cup for the Maple Leafs, McNeil ended up playing parts of seven seasons with Montreal. His last stint as a Canadien came during the 1956-57 regular season when he returned from retirement to sub in for an asthmatic Jacques Plante. Canadiens won a Cup that year, too.

Gerry McNeil died in 2004 at the age of 78. For more on his life and times, his son David McNeil very good book is the one you want. In The Pressure of the Moment: Remembering Gerry McNeil (2016) also happens to be a fascinating cultural study of the game as well an incisive guide to the arts and anguishes of goaltending.

advantage leafs

Toronto’s Cal Gardner and Boston’s Grant Warwick each scored shorthanded in the first period of the game depicted here, a Wednesday-night tilt towards the end of March in 1949 in which the Leafs ended up beating the hometown Bruins by a score of 3-2. It was enough to put the Leafs into the playoff finals that year, where the would end up — seems so easy to say — beating the Detroit Red Wings to claim the Stanley Cup.

Toronto got a second goal in the first period from 20-year-old left winger Ray Timgren (lower left), and that’s the one we’re seeing going in here. “With his back to Frank Brimsek, Ray managed to move his stick just in time to nudge in a 35-foot drive by [Jim] Thomson,” reported Boston’s Daily Globe on the morrow. Max Bentley put away what would be the Leafs’ winner in the second period. The goal Boston’s Johnny Peirson scored in the last minute of the game? “Really only a gesture,” wrote Tom Fitzgerald. Also on hand here are Boston’s Fernie Flaman (10) and Murray Henderson (8) and Toronto’s Joe Klukay alongside Ted Kennedy (9). The attentive referee is, unmistakably, King Clancy.

hockey night finale

He’ll be missed — oh, baby, will he. Bob Cole takes one last turn behind the play-by-play mic on Hockey Night In Canada: the inimitable 85-year-old Newfoundlander is hanging up his broadcasting booth after 50 years on the job. His final game goes tonight at Montreal’s Bell Centre when the Canadiens host the Toronto Maple Leafs. His first fell on a Thursday, April 24, 1969, when Montreal beat the hometown Boston Bruins 2-1 in double overtime. Jean Béliveau scored the winner (the only overtime goal of his career) to wrap-up the Stanley Cup semi-final in six games. If you’re in the mood for appreciations of Cole’s work, Sean McIndoe’s tribute at The Athletic from earlier this week is worth your time (you do have to be subscriber). Dave Stubbs has a good interview with the man himself, too, over here.

(Top image: CBC Sports)

hands on

The Chicago Blackhawks honoured their two most distinguished Espositos last night, Tony and Phil, ahead of the game with the St. Louis Blues at the United Centre. You can watch the tribute video here below; above, those are Tony’s hands as he readies them for a night’s work in February of 1981 at Chicago’s Stadium.

puck management

Puckhound: Serge Chapleau’s 1992 watercolour-and-pencil portrait of Russ Courtnall, depicted during his time as a Canadiens winger. The anchored skates suggest that he wasn’t, at this particular point, displaying all the speed he was known for. And indeed it in was in ’92 that Courtnall, having played parts of five seasons with Montreal, found himself swapped to the Minnesota North Stars in exchange for Brian Bellows. © McCord Museum