why be a mere spectator?

“More men are being recruited or authorized here at the present time than at any period since the war started, and far more, of course, than ever before in the city’s history.” That was the word in the Montreal Gazette in January of 1916, just as the 148th Overseas Battalion, one of the Canadian Expeditionary Force’s newest infantry battalions, was getting ready to start recruiting. Here, from the archives, are a couple of the posters that went up to aid in that effort. Above, somewhere in France, out beyond the artillery, a lone soldier wonders why he isn’t being reinforced. The answer is right there in front of him, wafting out of the barrel of his Ross rifle: hockey.

If, as a Canadiens fan seeing this on a wall outside the Montreal Arena, the guilt didn’t get you, maybe would the promise of a real game and/or a challenge to your manhood do the trick? The poster below tweaks the taunting a little, revealing the laggardly fan at home, slippers on, browsing the sports pages in his recliner as the spectre of that other poster rises accusingly from the pipe he’s fortunate enough to be smoking.

Whatever the battalion’s marketing department’s view of hockey fans might have been, the 148th didn’t see a contradiction in welcoming as many of them as possible to the Arena on the night of January 27, 1916, for a “patriotic benefit” pitting veterans of the famous Ottawa Silver Seven against a team of former Montreal greats. The teams had previously played in Ottawa, drawing 3-3 a few nights earlier. Montreal older-timers included defenceman Dickie Boon, who’d captained the Montreal HC to successive Stanley Cups in 1902 and ’03, along with a parcel of other future Hall-of-Famers in Russell Bowie, Ernie Russell, and goaltender Riley Hern. Ottawa’s line-up of retired greats featured House Hutton, Harvey Pulford, Alf Smith, and Rat Westwick.

“Those who journeyed to the Arena to see a burlesque on hockey,” the Gazette reported, “were surprised as the players of both teams played as they did in their palmy days.” Powered by Bowie’s four goals, Montreal prevailed by a score of 6-2. The seven-a-side exhibition raised $1,500 on the night, which was divided between the 148thand another incipient battalion, the 150th.

“At the conclusion of the game,” the Gazette noted, “the officers of the regiments for whose benefit it was played journeyed to the dressing rooms to thank the players for their kindness in staging the game.” Players and officers alike later repaired to the St. Regis Hotel for an informal dinner. Guests, including Stanley Cup trustee William Foran, listened while they supped, to a musical program, “while speeches were made by nearly all present.”

 

gimme shelter

Maskmaster: Today’s the day that Jacques Plante decided that he’d had enough. It was in 1959, of course, that Andy Bathgate of the New York Rangers vengefully shot a puck that cut the Montreal goaltender’s face. Blood stanched, wounds stictched, Plante said he’d only return to the ice under the protection of the mask he’d been wearing in practice. Canadiens’ coach Toe Blake didn’t like it, but he agreed; the New York fans sang “For He’s A Jolly Good Fellow” as Plante regained the net. Showing here, on the anniversary, is Nadine Arsenault’s vivid hand-embroidered thread-and-textile portrait of Montreal’s iconic trailblazer. A Toronto editorial designer and illustrator, Arsenault exhibits her hockey portfolio at www.nadine.design.

 

 

road revel

Won Way: As the Washington Capitals gird themselves for today’s Stanley Cup parade, here’s Henri Richard in May of 1971 on his way through an adoring Montreal throng. His team had beaten the Chicago Black Hawks in seven games to win — well, it was their first championship since ’69, their fifth since 1965. The Cup itself led the way in the parade that year, sitting on a pedestal, riding a big green float alongside the entire marching band of the College Secondaire St. Stanislas. Canadiens captain Jean Béliveau came next in an open car. A local paper described his progress along the route: “Coatless and squinting in the bright sunlight he waved, smiled, shook hands and was totally Jean Béliveau.” The rest of the team followed him, two to a car, signing autographs as they went. The loudest cheers went to rookie goaltender Ken Dryden, “bread and butter man in the playoffs,” and Henri Richard (above), who’d scored two goals in the decisive 3-2 victory over the Chicago. (Image: Archives de la Ville de Montreal, VM94-Ed041-098)

haberdashery

Groomsman: Later in the decade, Marc Tardif would tear up the WHA, but let’s don’t forget that he honed his style and his scoring as a left winger for the NHL Canadiens. This post-practice dressing-room scene dates to that era, and while I wasn’t there, I’m going to say that if you were 23 in Montreal in the early 1970s, playing on a line with Rejean Houle and Guy Lafleur, winning Stanley Cups, you’d have had no choice but to try to express the lush glory of it all in your daily duds.